The Knit Stitch

Knitting is nothing more than a succession of yarn making "waves" and interlocking.  The trough of each wave is interlocked with the top of the previous wave, leaving the top of the new wave free.  To do this, a needle is used and a second needle helps to interlock the next wave.

Each loop that is, or has been on a needles, is a stitch.  A basic stitch has two sides, the knit side, which is smooth and looks like a "V", and the purl side, wich is rugged and bumpy.  The purl side clearly shows how the two waves interlock.  

When knitting, you decide which side of the stitch you want to show.  You can also interlock two or more stitches with one new loop (a decrease) or make two or more new loops in one stitch (increase).  You can make new loops without interlocking them with a previous stitch (yarn overs) as well.  While I've incredibly simplified it here, you can create thousands of stitch patterns with these 3 stitches, making fabrics of various textures and designs.

Right side - the side you want to show.  AKA front of work and right side rows

Wrong side - the side you don't want to show!  Although, some patterns look good from both sides, you want to mark the wrong side so you can keep your pattern directions straight.  AKA back of work  

 You could also be given directions that tell you to work on the wrong side at the front of work.    This will only happen when you knit flat pieces (like a scarf).  If you knit in tubes with a circular needle, the rows will become rounds and you will never turn the work.  All rounds will be either right-side or wrong-side.

Next time I'll talk about ways to change your stitch size and getting a gauge swatch that gaurantees your finished garment will fitThe Knit Stitch

Knitting is nothing more than a succession of yarn making "waves" and interlocking.  The trough of each wave is interlocked with the top of the previous wave, leaving the top of the new wave free.  To do this, a needle is used and a second needle helps to interlock the next wave.

Each loop that is, or has been on a needle, is a stitch.  A basic stitch has two sides, the knit side, which is smooth and looks like a "V," and the purl side, which is rugged and bumpy.  The purl side clearly shows how the two waves interlock.  

When knitting, you decide which side of the stitch you want to show.  You can also interlock two or more stitches with one new loop (a decrease) or make two or more new loops in one stitch (increase).  You can make new loops without interlocking them with a previous stitch (yarn overs) as well.  While I've incredibly simplified it here, you can create thousands of stitch patterns with these 3 stitches, making fabrics of various textures and designs.

♥ Right side - the side you want to show.  AKA front of work and right side rows

♥ Wrong side - the side you don't want to show!  Although some patterns look good from both sides, you want to mark the wrong side so you can keep your pattern directions straight.  AKA back of work  

 You could also be given directions that tell you to work on the wrong side at the front of work.    This will only happen when you knit flat pieces (like a scarf).  If you knit in tubes with a circular needle, the rows will become rounds, and you will never turn the work.  All rounds will be either right-side or wrong-side.

Next time I'll talk about ways to change your stitch size and getting a gauge swatch that guarantees your finished garment will fit.